DISCOVERING CHESTNUT HILL: The Conservancy honors Tabitha Oman and Myron Manternach home addition

by Shirley Hanson for the Chestnut Hill Conservancy
Posted 2/18/21

Their award honors the painstaking care that created their addition to their home at 122 Bethlehem Pike in Chestnut Hill.

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Log in

DISCOVERING CHESTNUT HILL: The Conservancy honors Tabitha Oman and Myron Manternach home addition

Posted

At the Chestnut Hill Conservancy’s annual meeting on January 10, Tabitha Oman and Myron Manternach received their Preservation Recognition Award.  Their award honors the painstaking care that created their addition to their home at 122 Bethlehem Pike in Chestnut Hill.

In 2014 they moved into their 1893 Queen Anne home.  But this move was not Myron’s introduction to Chestnut Hill. 

In 1992-1994 he lived in Chestnut Hill in a Woodward house and commuted to the Wharton School at Penn to earn his MBA.  He admired “the community’s access to Wissahickon Park, the architecture, and the shared value of preserving Chestnut Hill’s character.” 

Myron’s Wharton MBA led to a career in investment banking in New York City.  When his wife, an attorney, received an attractive job offer in Philadelphia, Myron eagerly encouraged her to accept.

They knew they were buying a “fixer upper,” and immediately they faced its surprises.  The water main broke, much of the electric wiring required replacement, and termite damage became visible.  A parade of ongoing demands emerged.  

As their “first major project,” they chose to renew the kitchen and pantry.  To undertake the work their real estate agent Barrett Stewart led them to Krieger Architects and Dennis F. Meyer, Inc., along with Meyer Woodworks.  These experts formed the team for their next major project:  to transform the existing mudroom into a family room. 

Their goals for the addition were to match the details and craftwork of their Queen Anne home. Their team was able to execute the traditional building practices required to construct the addition.  Also, they wanted a space that would satisfy their needs for contemporary living. 

Examples of their extraordinary care are everywhere.  The architectural elements were traced back to the main house for replication or inspiration. 

They selected new wood windows that matched the original first-floor windows of the house.  They were able to duplicate the size and profile of the window muntins and the materials used.  Also, they matched the wrap-around “built-in” copper gutter with its full cornice and modillions.

The interior of the family room received equal care.  The floor, for example, is quarter-sawn white oak.  Custom millwork and cabinetry fill the walls, responding to the room’s desired purpose.  All mortar joints were ground out and repointed to match the ribbon joints on the exterior.

Tabitha and Myron accomplished their vision.  In their new family room they joined the best of two worlds – the presence of details and craftwork from their 1893 Queen Anne home and the joy the addition will radiate through their lives now and into the future.  And they became one more star player in Chestnut Hill’s “shared value of preserving Chestnut Hill’s character.”

Comments

No comments on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here
Please log in or register to add your comment