Monument Lab considers historic art in a new light

Posted 12/2/21

Dr. Paul M. Farber, Director and Cofounder of the Monument Lab, a civic studio that evaluates the changing role of public art, is holding a Chestnut Hill Conservancy Zoom lecture on Dec. 8. at 7 p.m.

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Monument Lab considers historic art in a new light

Posted

Dr. Paul M. Farber, Director and Cofounder of the Monument Lab, a civic studio that evaluates the changing role of public art, is holding a Chestnut Hill Conservancy Zoom lecture on Dec. 8. at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 for members and $20 for non-members.

Farber will share insights from the non-profit public art and history studio’s work on public memory in Philadelphia and beyond.

Monument Lab began as a university classroom project in 2012 and has since become an internationally renowned civic studio grounded in the vision that “monuments must change.” Its focus is the history and location of statues that honor historic persons and events, and, as society evolves, reexamining that art through engagement workshops, facilitations, and special research projects.

In 2017, Monument Lab created a citywide project with the Philadelphia Mural Arts program to encourage the public to re-think how they interact with monuments they see around the city. Locally, artist Karyn Olivier created The Battle Is Joined in Vernon Park, which covered the existing statue of Jacob Pastorius with a mirrored box, the idea being to ask visitors to consider how historic facts and stories reflect a particular point of view.

Farber, who lives in Mt. Airy, holds a PhD and a MA in American Culture from the University of Michigan and a BA in Urban Studies from the University of Pennsylvania.  He holds several academic appointments and has contributed to numerous art and history publications.

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