‘Oliver’ at Quintessence in Mt. Airy; it is the Dickens

Curtain Call | November 30th, 2018 | Leave a comment

by Clark Groome I’d love to report that the Quintessence Theatre Group’s “Oliver!,” Lionel Bart’s magnificent musical take on Charles Dickens’ “Oliver Twist,” is getting a smashing production at Mt. Airy’s Sedgwick Theater. The truth is that director Alex Burns’ mounting (running through Dec. 23) is a mixed bag. Some of the scenes and performances […]

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‘Oliver’ at Quintessence in Mt. Airy; it’s the Dickens

Curtain Call | November 21st, 2018 | Leave a comment

by Clark Groome I’d love to report that the Quintessence Theatre Group’s “Oliver!,” Lionel Bart’s magnificent musical take on Charles Dickens’ “Oliver Twist,” is getting a smashing production at Mt. Airy’s Sedgwick Theater. The truth is that director Alex Burns’ mounting (running through Dec. 23) is a mixed bag. Some of the scenes and performances […]

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Latest incarnation of ‘Holiday Inn’ a joy to behold

Curtain Call | September 21st, 2018 | Leave a comment

by Clark Groome To an old musical comedy lover who grew up in what is now known as “The Golden Age of the American Musical” (roughly 1943 to 1970), the Walnut Street Theatre Company’s energetic, entertaining and impressive production of “Irving Berlin’s Holiday Inn” is a joy to behold. It’s not just nostalgia that makes […]

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Simon says: ‘Beach’ in Ambler a very pleasant place to visit

Curtain Call | June 2nd, 2017 | Leave a comment

by Clark Groome  Neil Simon has written some of the English-speaking theater’s most popular plays. The prolific author of “Come Blow Your Horn,” “Barefoot in the Park,” “The Odd Couple,” “Plaza Suite.” “The Prisoner of Second Avenue,” “Lost in Yonkers,” “Laughter on the 23rd Floor” and so many other plays and musicals has quite possibly […]

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‘Bird’ sophomoric at times but graduates with honors

Curtain Call | September 29th, 2016 | Leave a comment

by Clark Groome “Stupid F&*king Bird,” Aaron Posner’s play with the media-unfriendly title, has been described as a “deconstruction” of Anton Chekhov’s “The Seagull.” Should, therefore, the theatergoer have a familiarity with the original Chekhov piece? Ideally no. But on opening night I felt as though there might be references in Posner’s piece that would […]

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