The ‘Bard’ himself (center, played by Christopher Maloney) joins a few of the street festival ladies, mime performers, and jugglers. Pictured here are the mimes played by Owen Williamson (left) and Alex Moon (right), Juliet (left) played by Aileen Mansfield, Juggler played by Thomas Woolley, and ladies-in-waiting (far right) played by Lilly Gilmore and Abby Schwenger. (Photo by Terri Hutsell)

The ‘Bard’ himself (center, played by Christopher Maloney) joins a few of the street festival ladies, mime performers, and jugglers. Pictured here are the mimes played by Owen Williamson (left) and Alex Moon (right), Juliet (left) played by Aileen Mansfield, Juggler played by Thomas Woolley, and ladies-in-waiting (far right) played by Lilly Gilmore and Abby Schwenger. (Photo by Terri Hutsell)

It was much ado about Shakespeare on April 23 as the “Bard of Avon” turned 450. Culminating their study of the works of William Shakespeare and in a tribute to this anniversary, Norwood-Fontbonne’s eighth grade students hosted a Renaissance-themed street festival on campus.

William Shakespeare himself greeted sixth- and seventh- grade fair goers, helping them to navigate the 14 festival offerings, ranging from whimsical to informative. First stop, exchanging U.S. currency for shillings!

Prior to the outdoor festival, the eighth graders read and studied “Romeo and Juliet” followed by attendance at the Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre production of the famous love story.

“There they witnessed some of the finer details of the play, which cannot be gleaned from a book,” explained English language arts teacher Judy Riviezzo. “The performance truly inspired their creativity and authentic presentation of their festival events.”

Interactive games such as “Pall Mall” (croquet) and “To Juggle or Not to Juggle,” delighted fair goers just as much as “Mime-Time” or the “Fantastical Magical Puppet Theatre” featuring a modern comedic twist on the battle of the Montagues vs. the Capulets.

Ladies and gentlemen could make their own Renaissance-fashioned hats, have an old-time photo taken at the photo booth and take a virtual tour around the Globe (Theatre). Elizabethan food fare included the “William Milk-Shakespeare” booth, “Got Glogg?,” and Shakespearian mini cakes.